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The “s” in APES stands for spooky

Working+hard+in+the+midst+of+the+hot+sun%2C+Alex+Lee+%2811%29+and+Shaan+Patel+%2811%29+discuss+the+possible+life+of+the+person+beneath+the+grave.+The+boys+made+light+of+the+grim+surroundings+by+keeping+a+playful+environment+around+them.+%E2%80%9CMrs+Fulford+is+a+really+cool+teacher%2C%E2%80%9D+Lee+said.++%E2%80%9CShe+likes+to+joke+with+us%2C+which+makes+a+tough+AP+class+like+this+a+little+more+bearable.%E2%80%9D
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The “s” in APES stands for spooky

Working hard in the midst of the hot sun, Alex Lee (11) and Shaan Patel (11) discuss the possible life of the person beneath the grave. The boys made light of the grim surroundings by keeping a playful environment around them. “Mrs Fulford is a really cool teacher,” Lee said.  “She likes to joke with us, which makes a tough AP class like this a little more bearable.”

Working hard in the midst of the hot sun, Alex Lee (11) and Shaan Patel (11) discuss the possible life of the person beneath the grave. The boys made light of the grim surroundings by keeping a playful environment around them. “Mrs Fulford is a really cool teacher,” Lee said. “She likes to joke with us, which makes a tough AP class like this a little more bearable.”

Hannah Elliott

Working hard in the midst of the hot sun, Alex Lee (11) and Shaan Patel (11) discuss the possible life of the person beneath the grave. The boys made light of the grim surroundings by keeping a playful environment around them. “Mrs Fulford is a really cool teacher,” Lee said. “She likes to joke with us, which makes a tough AP class like this a little more bearable.”

Hannah Elliott

Hannah Elliott

Working hard in the midst of the hot sun, Alex Lee (11) and Shaan Patel (11) discuss the possible life of the person beneath the grave. The boys made light of the grim surroundings by keeping a playful environment around them. “Mrs Fulford is a really cool teacher,” Lee said. “She likes to joke with us, which makes a tough AP class like this a little more bearable.”

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On block days September 19 and 20, AP environmental science teacher  Whitney Fulford (faculty) took her  class across the street from their school to the Leesburg Cemetery. The purpose of the cemetery visit was to calculate death rates and survivorship using real people’s graves. The class has been learning about demography, or the study of the characteristics of human populations.

“Sure it was a little odd,” Savion Williams (11) said. “But what better way to compare data from different time periods than to look at a few centuries’  worth of graves.”

photo credits: H.Elliott After goofing off on the way to the Leesburg Cemetery, Jessica Pavlik (11) and Savion Williams (11) study the birth and death years on multiple graves in the graveyard. These students went to the cemetery with the APES teacher to get a hands on experience for what they were learning. “Going to the cemetery was a really interesting idea,” Jessica Pavlik (11) said. “It helped me understand what demography actually is.”

Students were asked to find ten graves for each of the following categories: females who died before 1950, females who died after 1950, males who died before 1950, and males who died after 1950. The students wandered around the large cemetery, looking through Leesburg’s history to find people for each part of the chart.

“Going to the cemetery was a really interesting idea,” Jessica Pavlik (11) said. “It helped me understand what demography actually is.”

After their charts were completed, the classes walked back to room 310 to continue with the project. The next part of the activity was less playful and more serious. Using the birth and death years on the graves, the age at death was easily calculated. Line graphs were made with each category in order to show common death rates for each era.

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About the Contributor
Hannah Elliott, Co-Editor

Hi, my name is Hannah Elliott, and I am a junior this year, as well as a dual enrollment student with Georgia Southwestern. I am the Co-Editor, Head Copy...

2 Comments

2 Responses to “The “s” in APES stands for spooky”

  1. Jason Alvarez on October 4th, 2018 9:24 am

    Pretty cool to hear about how a class is able to get a better understanding of their subject. Also I like the pictures. This is good because I can barely read.

  2. Lindsey Ethridge on October 4th, 2018 12:28 pm

    We did this last year in Ms. Jones’ environmental class. I thought it was a little odd, but the project was fun.

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The “s” in APES stands for spooky